Designing, Conducting, and Publishing Quality Research in Mathematics Education

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Keith Leatham is the editor of Designing, Conducting, and Publishing Quality Research in Mathematics Education.

Who would you say is the target audience for your book?

The target audience for the book is novice mathematics education researchers–graduate students and new faculty members.

What is the big problem you hoped to address with this book?

Many novice researchers wish there were more resources to help induct them into the nuts and bolts of designing, conducting, and publishing quality research. This book was written to fill that void for novice mathematics education researchers. Each author considered the following prompt with regard to their chapter: “Imagine you were meeting with a mathematics education graduate student or assistant professor and they were struggling with an issue related to designing, conducting, or publishing quality research in mathematics education. Write the chapter you would want to recommend as part of your mentoring.”

What are some of the key ideas in the book?

The book offers practical guidance with regards to many research-related activities such as using and writing about theoretical frameworks, conducting literature reviews, building research teams and programs, securing funding, choosing publication venues, and responding to manuscript reviews.

Preface to book:

The purpose of this book is to disseminate collective wisdom with respect to designing, conducting, and publishing quality research in mathematics education. This wisdom has been gleaned from among those who, over the past several decades, have been instrumental in guiding the field in the pursuit of excellence in mathematics education research—insightful editors, educative reviewers, prolific writers, and caring mentors. Each chapter is written to the novice researcher with the intent of aiding them in avoiding common pitfalls, navigating difficult intellectual terrain, and understanding that they are not alone in experiencing rejection, frustration, confusion, and doubt. The authors were asked to write chapters with this prompt in mind: Imagine you were meeting with a mathematics education graduate student or assistant professor and they were struggling with an issue related to designing, conducting, or publishing quality research in mathematics education. Write the chapter you would want to recommend as part of your mentoring.